wind


wind
{{11}}wind (n.1) "air in motion," O.E. wind, from P.Gmc. *wendas (Cf. O.S., O.Fris., M.Du., Du. wind, O.N. vindr, O.H.G. wind, Ger. Wind, Goth. winds), from PIE *we-nt-o- "blowing," from root *we- "to blow" (Cf. Skt. va-, Gk. aemi-, Goth. waian, O.E. wawan, O.H.G. wajan, Ger. wehen, O.C.S. vejati "to blow;" Skt. vatah, Avestan vata-, Hittite huwantis, L. ventus, O.C.S. vetru, Lith. vejas "wind;" Lith. vetra "tempest, storm;" O.Ir. feth "air;" Welsh gwynt, Bret. gwent "wind").
Normal pronunciation evolution made this word rhyme with kind and rind (Donne rhymes it with mind), but it shifted to a short vowel 18c., probably from influence of windy, where the short vowel is natural. A sad loss for poets, who now must rhyme it only with sinned and a handful of weak words. Symbolic of emptiness and vanity since late 13c.
I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind. [Ernest Dowson, 1896]
Meaning "breath" is attested from late Old English; especially "breath in speaking" (early 14c.), so LONG-WINDED (Cf. long-winded), also "easy or regular breathing" (early 14c.), hence second wind in the figurative sense (by 1830), an image from the sport of hunting.
Figurative phrase which way the wind blows for "the current state of affairs" is suggested from c.1400. To get wind of "receive information about" is by 1809, perhaps inspired by Fr. avoir le vent de. To take the wind out of (one's) sails in the figurative sense (by 1883) is an image from sailing, where a ship without wind can make no progress. Wind-chill index is recorded from 1939. Wind energy from 1976. Wind vane from 1725.
{{12}}wind (n.2) "an act of winding round," 1825, from WIND (Cf. wind) (v.1) . Earlier, "an apparatus for winding," late 14c., in which use perhaps from a North Sea Germanic word, e.g. M.Du., M.L.G. winde "windlass."
{{12}}wind (v.1) "move by turning and twisting," O.E. windan "to turn, twist, wind" (class III strong verb; past tense wand, pp. wunden), from P.Gmc. *wendanan (Cf. O.S. windan, O.N. vinda, O.Fris. winda, Du. winden, O.H.G. wintan, Ger. winden, Goth. windan "to wind"), from PIE *wendh- "to turn, wind, weave" (Cf. L. viere "twist, plait, weave," vincire "bind," Lith. vyti "twist, wind"). Related to WEND (Cf. wend), which is its causative form, and to WANDER (Cf. wander). Wind down "come to a conclusion" is recorded from 1952; wind up "come to a conclusion" is from 1825. Winding sheet "shroud of a corpse" is attested from early 15c.
{{13}}wind (v.2) "to perceive by scent, get wind of," early 15c., from WIND (Cf. wind) (n.1). Of horns, etc., "make sound by blowing through," from 1580s. Meaning "tire, put out of breath; render temporarily breathless by a blow or punch" is from 1811, originally in pugilism. Related: Winded; winding.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • Wind — von etwas bekommen (kriegen): heimlich davon erfahren, eine Ahnung von etwas haben.{{ppd}}    Die Redensart stammt aus der Jägersprache. Das Wild bekommt vom Jäger Wind, d.h. ›Witterung‹; der Wind bringt seiner feinen Nase den Geruch des Jägers… …   Das Wörterbuch der Idiome

  • Wind — (w[i^]nd, in poetry and singing often w[imac]nd; 277), n. [AS. wind; akin to OS., OFries., D., & G. wind, OHG. wint, Dan. & Sw. vind, Icel. vindr, Goth winds, W. gwynt, L. ventus, Skr. v[=a]ta (cf. Gr. ah ths a blast, gale, ah^nai to breathe hard …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wind — wind1 [wīnd] vt. wound or Rare winded, winding [ME winden < OE windan, akin to ON vinda, Ger winden < IE base * wendh , to turn, wind, twist > Arm gind, a ring] 1. a) to turn, or make revolve [to wind a crank] b) to move by or as if by… …   English World dictionary

  • Wind It Up — Single par Gwen Stefani extrait de l’album The Sweet Escape Sortie 31 octobre 2006 (Amérique du Nord) décembre 2006(monde) Enregistrement 2005 Durée 3:09 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Wind It Up — Veröffentlichung März 1993 Länge 4:33 (Album) 3:29 (Single Edit) Genre(s) Big Beat, Breakcore Autor(en) Liam Howlett …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Wind — Wind, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wound} (wound) (rarely {Winded}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Winding}.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. {Wander}, {Wend}.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wind — Ⅰ. wind [1] ► NOUN 1) the perceptible natural movement of the air, especially in the form of a current blowing from a particular direction. 2) breath as needed in physical exertion, speech, playing an instrument, etc. 3) Brit. air swallowed while …   English terms dictionary

  • wind — wind, breeze, gale, hurricane, zephyr are comparable rather than synonymous terms that can all basically mean air in motion. Wind is the general term referable to any sort of natural motion whatever its degree of velocity or of force {a strong… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Wind it up — «Wind it Up» Sencillo de Gwen Stefani del álbum The Sweet Escape Formato CD, sencillo físico Descarga digital disco de vinilo Grabación 2005 Género(s) Pop …   Wikipedia Español

  • Wind — Wind: Das gemeingerm. Substantiv mhd. wint, ahd. wind, got. winds, engl. wind, schwed. vind gehört mit Entsprechungen in anderen idg. Sprachen zu der unter ↑ wehen dargestellten idg. Wurzel, vgl. z. B. tochar. A wänt »Wind«, lat. ventus »Wind« (↑ …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • Wind'It — is a wind power implantation concept, developed by the French design office Elioth with the architects team Encore Heureux. Principle Wind It s principle is simple : using electricity pylons to host wind turbines. Those wind turbines would be… …   Wikipedia


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