state

{{11}}state (n.1) early 13c., "circumstances, temporary attributes of a person or thing, conditions," from L. status "manner of standing, position, condition," noun of action from pp. stem of stare "to stand" from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see STET (Cf. stet)). Some M.E. senses are via O.Fr. estat (Fr. état; see ESTATE (Cf. estate)). The Latin word was adopted into other modern Germanic languages (e.g. Ger., Du. staat) but chiefly in the political senses only. Meaning "physical condition as regards form or structure" is attested from late 13c. Meaning "mental or emotional condition" is attested from 1530s (phrase state of mind first attested 1749); colloquial sense of "agitated or perturbed state" is from 1837.
He [the President] shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. [U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section iii]
{{12}}state (n.2) "political organization of a country, supreme civil power, government," 1530s, from STATE (Cf. state) (n.1); this sense grew out of the meaning "condition of a country" with regard to government, prosperity, etc. (late 13c.), from L. phrases such as status rei publicæ "condition of the republic." Often in phrase church and state, which is attested from 1580s.
The sense of "semi-independent political entity under a federal authority" (as in the United States of America) is from 1856; the British North American colonies occasionally were called states as far back as 1630s. The states has been short for "the United States of America" since 1777; hence stateside (1944), World War II U.S. military slang. State rights in U.S. political sense is attested from 1798; form states rights is first recorded 1858.
{{12}}state (v.) 1590s, "to set in a position," from STATE (Cf. state) (n.1); the sense of "declare in words" is first attested 1640s, from the notion of "placing" something on the record. Related: Stated; stating.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • state — state, the state The state is a distinct set of institutions that has the authority to make the rules which govern society . It has, in the words of Max Weber, a ‘monopoly on legitimate violence’ within a specific territory. Hence, the state… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • State — (st[=a]t), n. [OE. stat, OF. estat, F. [ e]tat, fr. L. status a standing, position, fr. stare, statum, to stand. See {Stand}, and cf. {Estate}, {Status}.] 1. The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at any given time. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • state — [steɪt] noun 1. [countable usually singular] the condition that someone or something is in at a particular time: • The property market is in a poor state. • I personally think the economy is in a worse state than the Government has been admitting …   Financial and business terms

  • state — n often attrib 1 a: a politically organized body of people usu. occupying a definite territory; esp: one that is sovereign b: the political organization that has supreme civil authority and political power and serves as the basis of government… …   Law dictionary

  • state — [stāt] n. [ME < OFr & L: OFr estat < L status, state, position, standing < pp. of stare, to STAND] 1. a set of circumstances or attributes characterizing a person or thing at a given time; way or form of being; condition [a state of… …   English World dictionary

  • state — state; state·hood; state·less; state·less·ness; state·let; state·li·ly; state·li·ness; state·sid·er; su·per·state; tung·state; un·state; mi·cro·state; mini·state; in·ter·state; state·ly; state·ment; …   English syllables

  • state — ► NOUN 1) the condition of someone or something at a particular time. 2) a nation or territory considered as an organized political community under one government. 3) a community or area forming part of a federal republic. 4) (the States) the… …   English terms dictionary

  • state — It is usual to spell it with a capital initial letter when it refers to political entities, either nations (The State of Israel / a State visit), or parts of a federal nation (the State of Virginia / crossing the State border), and when it means… …   Modern English usage

  • State — State, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Stating}.] 1. To set; to settle; to establish. [R.] [1913 Webster] I myself, though meanest stated, And in court now almost hated. Wither. [1913 Webster] Who calls the council, states the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • state — [n1] condition or mode of being accompaniment, attitude, capacity, case, category, chances, character, circumstance, circumstances, contingency, element, environment, essential, estate, event, eventuality, fix, footing, form, frame of mind, humor …   New thesaurus

  • State — (st[=a]t), a. 1. Stately. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. Belonging to the state, or body politic; public. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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