hand

{{11}}hand (n.) O.E. hond, hand "hand; side; power, control, possession," from P.Gmc. *khanduz (Cf. O.S., O.Fris., Du., Ger. hand, O.N. hönd, Goth. handus). The original Old English plural handa was superseded in Middle English by handen, later hands. Meaning "person who does something with his hands" is from 1580s, hence "hired workman" (1630s) and "sailor in a ship's crew" (1660s). Clock and watch sense is from 1570s. Meaning "round of applause" is from 1838. The linear measure of 4 inches (originally 3) is from 1560s, now used only in giving the height of horses. The meaning "playing cards held in one player's hand" is from 1620s; that of "a round at a card game" is from 1620s.
First hand, second hand, etc. (mid-15c.) are from the notion of something being passed down from hand to hand. Out of hand (1590s) is opposite of in hand "under control" (c.1200). Hand over fist (1825) is suggestive of sailors and fishermen hauling in nets. Hand jive is from 1958. To win something hands down (1855) is from horse racing, from a jockey's gesture of letting the reins go loose in an easy victory.
The Two Thousand Guinea Stakes was not the best contested one that it has been our fortune to assist at. ... [T]hey were won by Meteor, with Scott for his rider; who went by the post with his hands down, the easiest of all easy half-lengths. Wiseacre certainly did the best in his power to spoil his position, and Misdeal was at one time a little vexatious. ["The Sportsman," report from April 26, 1840]
To hand it to (someone) "acknowledge someone's ability" is slang from c.1906. Phrase on the one hand ... on the other hand is recorded from 1630s, a figurative use of the physical sense of hand in reference to position on one side or the other side of the body (as in the lefthand side), which goes back to O.E. Hands up! as a command from a policeman, robber, etc., is from 1873. Hand-to-mouth is from c.1500. Hand-in-hand attested from c.1500 as "with hands clasped;" figurative sense of "concurrently" recorded from 1570s.
{{12}}hand (v.) c.1400, "take charge of, seize," from HAND (Cf. hand) (n.). Meaning "to pass (something to someone)" is from 1640s. Related: Handed; handing.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • hand — hand …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Hand... — Hand …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Hand- — Hand …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Hand — (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in man and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hand — [hand] n. [ME < OE, akin to Goth handus < base of hinthan, to seize (hence, basic sense “grasper”) < ? IE base * kent , ? to seize] I 1. the part of the human body attached to the end of the forearm, including the wrist, palm, fingers,… …   English World dictionary

  • hand — ► NOUN 1) the end part of the arm beyond the wrist. 2) (before another noun ) operated by or held in the hand. 3) (before another noun or in combination ) done or made manually. 4) a pointer on a clock or watch indicating the passing of units of… …   English terms dictionary

  • Hand — Hand: Die gemeingerm. Körperteilbezeichnung mhd., ahd. hant, got. handus, engl. hand, schwed. hand gehört wahrscheinlich als ablautende Substantivbildung zu der Sippe von got. hinÞan »fangen, greifen« und bedeutet demnach eigentlich »Greiferin,… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • Hand — (h[a^]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Handed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Handing}.] 1. To give, pass, or transmit with the hand; as, he handed them the letter. [1913 Webster] 2. To lead, guide, or assist with the hand; to conduct; as, to hand a lady into a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hand — Sf std. (8. Jh.), mhd. hant, ahd. hant, as. hand Stammwort. Aus g. * handu f. Hand , auch in gt. handus, anord. ho̧nd, ae. hond, afr. hand, hond. Herkunft umstritten. Denkbar ist ein Anschluß an g. * henþ a Vst. fangen, ergreifen in gt.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Hand — /hand/, n. Learned /lerr nid/, 1872 1961, U.S. jurist. * * * End part of the arm, consisting of the wrist joint, palm, thumb, and fingers. The hand has great mobility and flexibility to carry out precise movements. Bipedal locomotion in humans… …   Universalium

  • Hand — (Schönheitspflege). Es ist längst anerkannt, daß zarte Hände und Arme zu den vorzüglichsten Erfordernissen weiblicher Schönheit gehören, und glücklicher Weise sind die Mittel, sie zu erlangen, die unschuldigsten unter allen Toilettenkünsten. Wem… …   Damen Conversations Lexikon

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