night


night
night (n.) O.E. niht (W.Saxon neaht, Anglian næht, neht) "night, darkness;" the vowel indicating that the modern word derives from oblique cases (gen. nihte, dat. niht), from P.Gmc. *nakht- (Cf. O.S., O.H.G. naht, O.Fris., Du., nacht, Ger. Nacht, O.N. natt, Goth. nahts), from PIE *nekwt- "night" (Cf. Gk. nuks "a night," L. nox, O.Ir. nochd, Skt. naktam "at night," Lith. naktis "night," O.C.S. nosti, Rus. noch', Welsh henoid "tonight"), according to Watkins, probably from a verbal root *neg- "to be dark, be night." For spelling with -gh- see FIGHT (Cf. fight).
The fact that the Aryans have a common name for night, but not for day (q.v.), is due to the fact that they reckoned by nights. [Weekley]
Cf. Ger. Weihnachten "Christmas." In early times, the day was held to begin at sunset, so Old English monanniht "Monday night" was the night before Monday, or what we would call Sunday night.
To work nights preserves the Old English genitive of time. Night shift is attested from 1710 in the sense of "garment worn by a woman at night" (see SHIFT (Cf. shift) (n.1)); meaning "gang of workers employed after dark" is from 1839. Night soil "excrement" (1770) is so called because it was removed (from cesspools, etc.) after dark. Night train attested from 1838. Night life "habitual nocturnal carousing" attested from 1852.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • Night — (n[imac]t), n. [OE. night, niht, AS. neaht, niht; akin to D. nacht, OS. & OHG. naht, G. nacht, Icel. n[=o]tt, Sw. natt, Dan. nat, Goth. nahts, Lith. naktis, Russ. noche, W. nos, Ir. nochd, L. nox, noctis, Gr. ny x, nykto s, Skr. nakta, nakti.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • night — W1S1 [naıt] n [U and C] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(when it is dark)¦ 2¦(evening)¦ 3 nights 4 night! 5 night night! 6 night and day/day and night 7 night or day/day or night 8 night after night 9 first night/opening night …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • night — [nīt] n. [ME niht < OE, akin to Ger nacht < IE base * nekwt , * nokwt > Gr nyx (gen. nyktos), L nox (gen. noctis), night] 1. a) the period from sunset to sunrise b) the period of actual darkness after sunset and before sunrise; also, a… …   English World dictionary

  • night|ly — «NYT lee», adjective, adverb. –adj. 1. done, happening, or appearing every night: »nightly attacks, nightly disorder. 2. done, happening, or appearing at night: »nightly dew, a nightly visitor. 3. of or belonging to night; characteristic of night …   Useful english dictionary

  • night — (izg. nȃjt) DEFINICIJA 1. ž noć [London by night London noću] 2. prid. <indekl.> noćni (i jedno i drugo u vezama riječi) SINTAGMA night club (izg. night klȁb) noćni klub, bar, klub kao ugostiteljsko mjesto otvorenog ili zatvorenog tipa koji …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • Night — ist der Name folgender Personen: Candice Night (* 1971), US amerikanische Rocksängerin Julie Night (* 1978), US amerikanische Pornodarstellerin Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demselben Wor …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • night — s.m.inv. ES ingl. night club {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: 1960. ETIMO: tratto dalla loc. night club …   Dizionario italiano

  • night — /ingl. naɪt/ [ingl., accorc. di night club] s. m. inv. (fam.) V. night club (ingl.) …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • night — ► NOUN 1) the time from sunset to sunrise. 2) the darkness of night. 3) literary nightfall. 4) an evening. ► ADVERB (nights) informal ▪ at night. ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • night|ed — «NY tihd», adjective. Archaic. 1. made dark as night: »nighted colour (Shakespeare). 2. overtaken by night; benighted: »Upon the nighted pilgrim s way (Scott) …   Useful english dictionary


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