lap

{{11}}lap (n.) O.E. læppa (pl. læppan) "skirt or flap of a garment," from P.Gmc. *lapp- (Cf. O.Fris. lappa, O.S. lappo, M.Du. lappe, Du. lap, O.H.G. lappa, Ger. Lappen "rag, shred," O.N. leppr "patch, rag"), from PIE root *leb- "be loose, hang down." Sense of "lower part of a shirt" led to that of "upper legs of seated person" (c.1300). Used figuratively ("bosom, breast") from late 14c.; e.g. lap of luxury, first recorded 1802. From 15c.-In 17c. the word (often in plural) was a euphemism for "female pudendum," but this is not the source of lap dance, which is first recorded 1993.
To lap dance, you undress, sit your client down, order him to stay still and fully clothed, then hover over him, making a motion that you have perfected by watching Mister Softee ice cream dispensers. [Anthony Lane, review of "Showgirls," "New Yorker," Oct. 16, 1995]
That this is pleasure and not torment for the client is something survivors of the late 20c. will have to explain to their youngers.
{{12}}lap (v.1) "take up liquid with the tongue," from O.E. lapian "to lap up, drink," from P.Gmc. *lapajanan (Cf. O.H.G. laffen "to lick," O.S. lepil, Du. lepel, Ger. Löffel "spoon"), from PIE imitative base *lab- (Cf. Gk. laptein "to sip, lick," L. lambere "to lick"), indicative of licking, lapping, smacking lips. Meaning "splash gently" first recorded 1823, based on similarity of sound. Related: Lapped; lapping.
{{12}}lap (v.2) "to lay one part over another," early 14c., "to surround (something with something else)," from LAP (Cf. lap) (n.). Figurative use, "to envelop (in love, sin, desire, etc.)" is from mid-14c. The sense of "to get a lap ahead (of someone) on a track" is from 1847, on notion of "overlapping." The noun in this sense is 1670s, originally "something coiled or wrapped up;" meaning "a turn around a track" (1861) also is from this sense. Related: Lapped; lapping; laps.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • Lap — (l[a^]p), n. [OE. lappe, AS. l[ae]ppa; akin to D. lap patch, piece, G. lappen, OHG. lappa, Dan. lap, Sw. lapp.] 1. The loose part of a coat; the lower part of a garment that plays loosely; a skirt; an apron. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. An edge; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lap — Ⅰ. lap [1] ► NOUN ▪ the flat area between the waist and knees of a seated person. ● fall (or drop) into someone s lap Cf. ↑fall into someone s lap ● in someone s lap Cf. ↑in someone s lap …   English terms dictionary

  • lap — lap1 [lap] n. [ME lappe < OE læppa, fold or hanging part of a garment, skin; akin to Ger lappen < IE base * leb , lāb , to hang down > L labare, to totter, labi, to fall, sink, lapsus, a fall] 1. Now Rare the loose lower part of a… …   English World dictionary

  • LAP — 1922 1987 Jean Laplaine, dit Lap, fut l’un des personnages les plus représentatifs de la continuité caricaturale propre au Canard enchaîné . Il naquit à Joigny en 1922. Après avoir participé activement à la Résistance, il collabora au quotidien… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Lap — Lap, v. t. [OE. lappen to fold (see {Lap}, n.); cf. also OE. wlappen, perh. another form of wrappen, E, wrap.] 1. To fold; to bend and lay over or on something; as, to lap a piece of cloth. [1913 Webster] 2. To wrap or wind around something.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lap — Lap, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lapped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Lapping}.] 1. To rest or recline in a lap, or as in a lap. [1913 Webster] To lap his head on lady s breast. Praed. [1913 Webster] 2. To cut or polish with a lap, as glass, gems, cutlery, etc.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lap — Lap, v. i. To be turned or folded; to lie partly upon or by the side of something, or of one another; as, the cloth laps back; the boats lap; the edges lap. [1913 Webster] The upper wings are opacous; at their hinder ends, where they lap over,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • LAP — steht für: Lehrabschlussprüfung Lebensabschnittspartner, siehe Lebensgefährte Landesanstalt für Pflanzenbau Forchheim L.A.P., ein Spiel LAP Lambert Academic Publishing, ein Verlag der VDM Publishing Gruppe. Landschaftspflegerischer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lap — Lap, n. 1. The act of lapping with, or as with, the tongue; as, to take anything into the mouth with a lap. [1913 Webster] 2. The sound of lapping. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lap — Lap, v. i. [OE. lappen, lapen, AS. lapian; akin to LG. lappen, OHG. laffan, Icel. lepja, Dan. lade, Sw. l[ a]ppja, L. lambere; cf. Gr. ?, W. llepio. Cf. {Lambent}.] 1. To take up drink or food with the tongue; to drink or feed by licking up… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lap up — lap up, v. t. [See {lap}, v. i.] 1. To take up (drink or food) with the tongue; to drink by licking up. [1913 Webster] 2. (fig.) To accept or enjoy enthusiatically and uncritically. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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