lace


lace
{{11}}lace (n.) early 13c., laz, "cord made of braided or interwoven strands of silk, etc.," from O.Fr. laz "a net, noose, string, cord, snare" (Mod.Fr. lacs), from V.L. *lacium, from L. laqueum (nom. laqueus) "noose, snare" (It. laccio, Sp. lazo), a trapping and hunting term, probably from Italic base *laq- "to ensnare" (Cf. L. lacere "to entice"). Later also "net, noose, snare" (c.1300); "piece of cord used to draw together the edges of slits or openings in an article of clothing" (late 14c.). The "ornamental net pattern" meaning is first recorded 1550s. Sense of "cord for tying" remains in shoelace. As an adjective, lace-curtain "middle class" (or lower-class with middle-class pretensions) usually is used in reference to Irish-Americans, by 1928.
{{12}}lace (v.) c.1200, "fasten (clothing, etc.) with laces and ties;" see LACE (Cf. lace) (n.). Also "tighten (a garment) by pulling its laces" (early 14c.). To lace coffee, etc., with a dash of liquor (1670s) originally was used of sugar, and comes via the notion of "to ornament or trim." Related: Laced; lacing. Laced mutton was "an old word for a whore" [Johnson].

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • lace — lace …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • lacé — lacé …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Lace — • The two earliest known specimens of lace worked linen albs are that of St. Francis, preserved at St. Clare s convent, Assisi, and the alb of Pope Boniface VIII, now in the treasury of the Sistine Chapel Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Lace — is an openwork fabric, patterned with open holes in the work, made by machine or by hand. The holes can be formed via removal of threads or cloth from a previously woven fabric, but more often open spaces are created as part of the lace fabric.… …   Wikipedia

  • Lace — (l[=a]s), n. [OE. las, OF. laz, F. lacs, dim. lacet, fr. L. laqueus noose, snare; prob. akin to lacere to entice. Cf. {Delight}, {Elicit}, {Lasso}, {Latchet}.] 1. That which binds or holds, especially by being interwoven; a string, cord, or band …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lace — Lace, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laced} ([=a]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lacing}.] 1. To fasten with a lace; to draw together with a lace passed through eyelet holes; to unite with a lace or laces, or, figuratively. with anything resembling laces. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lace — [lās] n. [ME las < OFr las, laz < L laqueus, a noose, snare, trap < IE base * lēk > OE læla, a whip] 1. a string, ribbon, etc. used to draw together and fasten the parts of a shoe, corset, etc. by being drawn through eyelets or over… …   English World dictionary

  • Lace — Lace, v. i. To be fastened with a lace, or laces; as, these boots lace. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lace-up — n [C usually plural] especially BrE a shoe that is fastened with a lace >lace up adj ▪ shiny black lace up shoes …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lacé — lacé, ée (la sé, sée) part. passé de lacer. 1°   Serré avec un lacet. Corset bien lacé. Une femme lacée. 2°   S. m. Lacé, entrelacement de petits grains de verre, dont on orne les lustres …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • lace-up — (adj.) 1831, originally of boots, from LACE (Cf. lace) (v.) + UP (Cf. up) …   Etymology dictionary


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