keel


keel
{{11}}keel (n.) "lowest timber of a ship or boat," mid-14c., probably from a Scandinavian source, Cf. O.N. kjölr "keel," Dan. kjèl, Swed. köl, from P.Gmc. *keluz, of uncertain origin. Some etymologists say this is unconnected with the keel that means "a ship, barge," which also is the root of M.Du. kiel "ship," O.E. ceol "ship's prow," O.H.G. kiel, Ger. Kiel "ship," but the two words have influenced each other. Barnhart, however, calls them cognates. This other word is said to be from P.Gmc. *keula, from PIE *geul- "rounded vessel." Keel still is used locally in England and U.S. for "flat-bottomed boat," especially on the Tyne.
{{12}}keel (v.1) 1838, American English, from KEEL (Cf. keel) (n.). To keel over (1876) is from the nautical image of a ship turning keel-up. Related: Keeled; keeling.
{{12}}keel (v.2) "to keep cool," from M.E. kelen, from O.E. celan "to cool," from col "cool" (see COOL (Cf. cool)). The form kele (from O.E. colian) was used by Shakespeare, but it later was assimilated with the adjective form into the modern verb cool. Cognate with Du. koelen, O.H.G. chuolen, Ger. kühlen.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • Keel — Keel, n. [Cf. AS. ce[ o]l ship; akin to D. & G. kiel keel, OHG. chiol ship, Icel. kj[=o]ll, and perh. to Gr. gay^los a round built Ph[oe]nician merchant vessel, gaylo s bucket; cf. Skr. g[=o]la ball, round water vessel. But the meaning of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • keel — keel·age; keel·boat·man; keel·haul; keel·less; keel; keel·man; keel·son; va·keel; keel·er; keel·hale; …   English syllables

  • Keel — Pays d’origine  États Unis Genre musical Heavy metal, Glam Metal Années d activité …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Keel — Datos generales Origen  Estados Unidos, Los Ángeles, California …   Wikipedia Español

  • keel — [kiːl] noun on an even keel working smoothly without any sudden changes: • a strategy to put the economyon an even keel * * * keel UK US /kiːl/ noun [C] ● on an even keel Cf. on an even keel …   Financial and business terms

  • Keel — Keel, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Keeled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeling}.] 1. To traverse with a keel; to navigate. [1913 Webster] 2. To turn up the keel; to show the bottom. [1913 Webster] {To keel over}, to upset; to capsize. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • keel — keel1 [kēl] n. [ME kele < ON kjǫlr < Gmc * kelu < IE base * gel , to swallow > L gula, throat] 1. the chief timber or steel piece extending along the entire length of the bottom of a boat or ship and supporting the frame: it sometimes …   English World dictionary

  • Keel — (k[=e]l), v. t. & i. [AS. c[=e]lan to cool, fr. c[=o]l cool. See {Cool}.] To cool; to skim or stir. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] While greasy Joan doth keel the pot. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Keel — Allgemeine Informationen Genre(s) Hard Rock, Hair Metal Gründung 1984 Auflösung 1989 Neugründung 1998, 2 …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • keel|er — keel|er1 «KEE luhr», noun. Dialect. 1. a vessel for cooling liquids. 2. a shallow tub for various purposes. 3. a shallow box used in dressing mackerel. ╂[< keel5 + er1] keel|er2 «KEE luhr», noun. British. a sailboat having a keel rather than a …   Useful english dictionary

  • Keel — Keel, n. A brewer s cooling vat; a keelfat. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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