hold

{{11}}hold (n.1) "act of holding," c.1100; "grasp, grip," c.1200, from O.E. geheald (Anglian gehald) "keeping, custody, guard; watch, protector, guardian," from HOLD (Cf. hold) (v.). Meaning "place of refuge" is from c.1200; "fortified place" is from c.1300; "place of imprisonment" is from late 14c. Wrestling sense is from 1713. No holds barred "with all restrictions removed" is first recorded 1942 in theater jargon but is ultimately from wrestling. Telephoning sense is from c.1964, from expression hold the line, warning that one is away from the receiver, 1912.
{{12}}hold (n.2) "space in a ship below the lower deck, in which cargo is stowed," 15c. corruption in the direction of hold (v.) of O.E. hol "hole" (see HOLE (Cf. hole)), influenced by M.Du. hol "hold of a ship," and M.E. hul, which originally meant both "the hold" and "the hull" of a ship (see HULL (Cf. hull)). Or possibly from O.E. holu "husk, pod." All from PIE *kel- "to cover, conceal."
{{12}}hold (v.) O.E. haldan (Anglian), healdan (W.Saxon), "to contain, grasp; retain; foster, cherish," class VII strong verb (past tense heold, pp. healden), from P.Gmc. *haldanan (Cf. O.S. haldan, O.Fris. halda, O.N. halda, Du. houden, Ger. halten "to hold," Goth. haldan "to tend"), originally "to keep, tend, watch over" (as cattle), later "to have." Ancestral sense is preserved in BEHOLD (Cf. behold). The original pp. holden was replaced by held beginning 16c., but survives in some legal jargon and in BEHOLDEN (Cf. beholden).
Hold back is 1530s, trans.; 1570s, intrans.; hold off is early 15c., trans.; c.1600, intrans.; hold out is 1520s as “to stretch forth,” 1580s as “to resist pressure.” Hold on is early 13c. as “to maintain one's course,” 1830 as “to keep one's grip on something,” 1846 as an order to wait or stop. To hold (one's) tongue "be silent" is from c.1300. To hold (one's) own is from early 14c. To hold (someone's) hand "give moral support" is from 1935. Phrase hold your horses "be patient" is from 1844. To have and to hold have been paired alliteratively since at least c.1200, originally of marriage but also of real estate.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • Hold — Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed, tend… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — hold1 [hōld] vt. held, holding [ME holden < Anglian OE haldan (WS healdan), akin to Ger halten, Goth haldan, to tend sheep < IE base * kel , to drive, incite to action > Gr kelēs, swift horse, L celer, swift: prob. sense development:… …   English World dictionary

  • Hold On — may refer to:ongs* Hold On (Tim Armstrong song) * Hold On (En Vogue song) * Hold On (Good Charlotte song) * Hold On (Jonas Brothers song) * Hold On (Korn song) * Hold On (John Lennon song) * Hold On (Magnet song) * Hold On (Razorlight song) *… …   Wikipedia

  • hold — Ⅰ. hold [1] ► VERB (past and past part. held) 1) grasp, carry, or support. 2) keep or detain. 3) have in one s possession. 4) contain or be capable of containing. 5) have or occupy (a job or position) …   English terms dictionary

  • hold-up — [ ɔldɶp ] n. m. inv. • 1925; mot angl. amér., de to hold up one s hands « tenir les mains en l air » ♦ Anglic. Vol à main armée dans un lieu public. ⇒Fam. braquage. Hold up d une banque. Commettre un hold up. hold up n. m. inv. (Anglicisme)… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold on — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold up — Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough!… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — vb 1 hold back, withhold, reserve, detain, retain, *keep, keep back, keep out Analogous words: *restrain, inhibit, curb, check: preserve, conserve, *save Contrasted words: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, resign, yield 2 …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Hold — (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve pence within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hold Me — Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me» Sencillo de U2 del álbum Batman Forever Soundtrack Publicación 5 y 6 de junio 1995 …   Wikipedia Español

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