defer


defer
{{11}}defer (1) "to delay," late 14c., differren, deferren, from O.Fr. differer (14c.), from L. differre "carry apart, scatter, disperse;" also "be different, differ;" also "defer, put off, postpone," (see DIFFER (Cf. differ)). Etymologically identical with differ; the spelling and pronunciation differentiated from 15c., perhaps partly by association of this word with delay.
{{12}}defer (2) "yield," mid-15c., from M.Fr. déférer (14c.) "to yield, comply," from L. deferre "carry away, transfer, grant," from de- "down, away" (see DE- (Cf. de-)) + ferre "carry" (see INFER (Cf. infer)). Main modern sense is from meaning "refer (a matter) to someone," which also was in Latin.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • defer — de‧fer [dɪˈfɜː ǁ ˈfɜːr] verb deferred PTandPPX deferring PRESPARTX [transitive] to delay something until a later time or date: • The president may defer decisions on future defense spending cuts. • Further discussion on the proposal will be… …   Financial and business terms

  • Defer — De*fer , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Deferred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Deferring}.] [OE. differren, F. diff[ e]rer, fr. L. differre to delay, bear different ways; dis + ferre to bear. See {Bear} to support, and cf. {Differ}, {Defer} to offer.] To put off; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Defer — may refer to: Defer Elementary School, a Michigan State Historic Site Deference, the acknowledgement of the legitimacy of the power of one s superior or superiors Deferral, the delaying of the realization of an asset or liability until a future… …   Wikipedia

  • defer — I (put off) verb adjourn, arrest, be dilatory, bide, delay, detain, differre, discontinue, extend, file, forbear, forestall, gain time, hesitate, hinder, hold back, hold in abeyance, hold off, hold up, impede, interfere, interrupt, intervene,… …   Law dictionary

  • defer — Ⅰ. defer [1] ► VERB (deferred, deferring) ▪ put off to a later time; postpone. DERIVATIVES deferment noun deferral noun. ORIGIN Latin differre, from ferre bring, carry . Ⅱ …   English terms dictionary

  • Defer — De*fer , v. i. To put off; to delay to act; to wait. [1913 Webster] Pius was able to defer and temporize at leisure. J. A. Symonds. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Defer — De*fer , v. t. [F. d[ e]f[ e]rer to pay deference, to yield, to bring before a judge, fr. L. deferre to bring down; de + ferre to bear. See {Bear} to support, and cf. {Defer} to delay, {Delate}.] 1. To render or offer. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • defer to — (someone) to accept the opinion or judgment of someone else. In the end, you must defer to your boss, because the boss is always right …   New idioms dictionary

  • defer — [v1] hold off, put off adjourn, block, delay, detain, extend, give rain check*, hang fire*, hinder, hold up, impede, intermit, lay over, lengthen, obstruct, postpone, procrastinate, prolong, prorogue, protract, put on back burner*, put on hold*,… …   New thesaurus

  • Defer — De*fer , v. i. To yield deference to the wishes of another; to submit to the opinion of another, or to authority; with to. [1913 Webster] The house, deferring to legal right, acquiesced. Bancroft. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • defer to — index acknowledge (verify), comply, concur (agree), hear (give attention to), honor, obey …   Law dictionary


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